When “Content thee, gentle coz, let him alone.

When Bad Things Happen To Good PeopleWhen bad things happen to good people only a tragedy can result.

William Shakespeare’s play, Romeo and Juliet, is one of the best known tragedies of all time. A tragedy, like Romeo and Juliet, must have three elements which are the main characters are of noble birth, they are all around good people, and they have a character flaws. There is overwhelming evidence to substantiate these elements exist in Romeo and Juliet.

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Romeo and Juliet are of noble birth. Shakespeare tells that both families are of noble birth in the first sentence of the prologue. Shakespeare writes, “Two households, both alike in Dignity” (Shakespeare Prologue.1).

In this quote Shakespeare tells how both families are of the same rank or wealth in the society, during this time when a household has dignity it means it is also noble. Another example that shows each family is of the upper class is when Benvolio says, “Here were the servants of your adversary and yours” (I.i.97-98). This quote tells how each family has servants, and having servants is a sign of nobility. When one is blessed with nobility, they also bear the responsibility of being a good person and helping others. During the party that the Capulets hold, Lord Capulet says, “Content thee, gentle coz, let him alone.

A bears like a portly gentlemen. And, to the truth, Verona brags of him to be a virtuous and well-groomed youth” (I.v.64-67). Romeo is very well liked in the city of Verona.

Like Romeo, Juliet is a good person. The Nurse tells that Juliet is a good person when she meets up with Romeo in the church. The nurse says, “Well, sir, my mistress is the sweetest lady” (II.iv.

187). Juliet is one of the kindest people known in Verona. Romeo and Juliet are good people. Despite their best intentions, sometimes people make mistakes. For example, Juliet is young and can’t make up her mind. Juliet shows this on her balcony talking to Romeo. Juliet says to Romeo, “Well, do not swear.

Although I joy in thee, I must no joy of this contrast tonight. It is to rash, to unadvised, to sudden; to like lighting, which doth cease to be ere one can say it lightens” (II.II.118-120).

Once Juliet said this and walked back into her room she runs back out and says, “Three words, dear Romeo, and good night indeed. If thy bent.

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